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Utah Trees For Sale

Buying Trees and Shrubs in UtahThe Blue Spruce thrives in The Beehive State, where the semi-arid climate is advantageous for the tree. The Blue Spruce is a medium to large sized evergreen, with blue-green waxy leaves. In the wild the Blue Spruce can grow up to 75 feet tall, though usual ornamental plants rarely exceed 50 feet. Considered a conical evergreen conifer, the Blue Spruce is Christmas-tree shaped, with the bottom branches generally scraping the ground. Although at lower risk for loss, the Blue Spruce is threatened by several pests and diseases, including two types of aphids. Although the Blue Spruce can make a fine addition to a Utahn backyard, the Utah grower has several tree varieties from which to consider when planting.

Due to its large size, semi-arid climate, and varied temperatures, the smart Utahn grower will need to consider the following:


Best Trees for Utah

Read about the specifics for your state in the following sections. If you’re looking for some quick ideas on what to plant, consider the following trees as expert-tested and The Tree Center approved:

  1. Royal Empress Trees

Ideal for providing fast-growing shade, year-round beauty, and drought resistance.

  1. Bloodgood Japanese Maple

Ideal for adding color, providing ornamental beauty, and no-hassle maintenance.

  1. Dwarf Cavendish Banana Tree

Ideal for bearing fruit, providing character, and moving between inside or outside.

  1. Tulip Poplar

Ideal for providing fast-growing shade, year-round beauty, and drought resistance.

Fast Growing Privacy Trees in Utah

A state that without doubt deserves its millions of residents, Utah is continuing to attract new inhabitants from other parts of the United States. Although a boon for the local economy, new infrastructure can be invasive and annoying. Solutions exist for prying eyes and sound-producing highways. Trees that are cultivated to form protective barriers, better known as ‘privacy trees’ can be planted to afford the Utahn yard the solitude and peace it deserves.

Although there are many privacy trees the Utahn planter may plant, none is as fitting as the Willow Hybrid. The Willow Hybrid grow quickly, at upwards of 6 feet a year, and provides fast-growing privacy. Unlike many privacy tree species, the Willow Hybrid is not an evergreen but a subset of the willow, providing a unique barrier against intrusions of every kind. The Willow Hybrid is not the only option to choose from in STATE. Alternatively, consider the Thuja Green Giant or Juniper ‘Witchita Blue’.

Climate

Most of Utah lies in a semi-arid climate, with the western regions in the mountains often experiencing a multitude of climates. Summers are hot and winters are cold. summer temperatures vary throughout the state. Temperatures range from 85°F to 100°F throughout the region, though low humidity often leads to cooler evenings. Winters are cold and mountain regions can receive heavy snow. Utah’s most populated regions are at higher elevations, which causes colder temperatures. The record low for the state is -69°F set in 1985. The record high is 118° set in 2007.

Soil Type

Most trees require well-drained soil rich with minerals to grow. Mivida soils cover more than 200,000 acres of Utah. Easy to irrigate, these soils are used for pasture and agriculture. Regardless of the property’s location in The     Beehive State, a soon-to-be tree planter can perform a simple test to determine his/her soil type.

In order to determine the type of soil in your yard, try this test to give you a basis for finding the best matched trees. For this test, you will need a healthy handful of soil from the layer beneath the topmost piece of soil. The soil should be a little damp, but not recently watered or wet. Simply squeeze the soil sample and one of the following events will occur.

1. You have CLAY if, after opening your hands, the soil maintains its shape, forming a ball. If you touch the sample, it does not fall apart.
2. You have LOAM if, after opening your hands, the soil maintains its shape, forming a ball. If you touch the sample, it falls apart.
3. You have SAND if, after opening your hands, the soil immediately collapses.

Once you know what soil type you have, you can find trees best suited to the dirt’s properties. Loam is the best soil to have, as its unique qualities make it ideal for holding and transferring water to trees.

Average Precipitation

Rainfall is minimal in many parts of the state, where the sheltering effect of both the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the Wasatch Mountains leave most of Utah in a rain shadow. The rain Utah does receive comes from the Pacific Ocean via a northeastern route. Lower elevations receive less rain, usually 12 inches or less on average annually. St. George and the Great Salt Lake Desert frequently receive less than 5 inches of rain annually. On the other hand, Salt Lake City receives upwards of 60 inches of rain annually. Snow can also be variable. Snow has been recorded in every month of the year in some mountain ranges, which can receive, on average 500 inches of snow annually. This has led to a large ski-industry. Other areas of the state receive a slightly more moderate amount, between 50 to 100 inches of snow annually.

Irrigation

With variable rainfall amounts and heavy snow, irrigation systems can be an effective method for controlling and dispersing water. Some systems can even use the winter snow as melted water in later, drier summer days. Consider a drip or sprinkler system to assist with water control. Newly  planted trees require consistent and adequate water management, and irrigation systems can be an efficient tool for this.

Growing Zones

Utah’s diverse landscape is home to eleven distinct growing zones. A growing zone simply refers to the USDA’s determination of areas where certain plants are most likely to thrive, preferring to focus on minimal temperature ranges in which a plant can survive. Overall, temperatures are warmer in the south and cooler in the north and in higher elevations. In the south, both near Lake George and Lake Powell, temperatures are warmest, rarely dropping below 10°F. In some areas, temperatures may never drop below 20°F for extended time. Temperatures are coldest in the north, along the panhandle border area with Wyoming west of Logan. Here, temperatures may linger below -35°F for extended lengths of time. Central Utah is colder than its borders in both the east and west, and Salt Lake City falls into one of these moderate zones, where temperatures may drop to -15°F for a length of time.

Weather Damage

Thunderstorms and tornadoes are the most concerning natural weather disasters to occur in the area. Although thunderstorms are rare, they can be severe, touching down in the monsoon season between mid-July and mid-September. The drier soil of Utah often has difficulty in absorbing the heavy rainfall accompanied with the storm, which can lead to flash-flooding. Although tornadoes are uncommon and usually not deadly, the Salt Lake City Tornado of 1999 caused over $170,000,000.00 in damage. Plant trees away from powerlines and buildings, and near banks of streams and roads to ensure safety.Utah State TreeScientific Name: Picea Pungens
Common Name: Blue SpruceUtah State SoilMivida SoilUtah State FlagUtah State SealList Of Nurseries and Garden Centers in UtahIf you prefer to purchase your trees or shrubs in person instead of online, we offer this comprehensive guide to purchasing a tree at your local Utah nursery or garden center. However, since we don’t actually live in Utah we can’t guarantee this list to be 100% accurate – but we did attempt to be as accurate as we possibly could. We have no affiliation with any of the businesses listed below and make no guarantees as to the businesses’ ability or the quality of trees you will receive. As with any purchase you make, be sure to check out the business with the Better Business Bureau, references, and any other sources you may have.Alphabetical by CityAmerican Fork
Bountiful
Brigham City
Draper
Elsinore
Fairview
Hinckley
Hurricane
Kamas
Kamas
Kearns
Layton
Layton
Lindon
Logan
Logan
Lyman
Moab
Murray
Murray
Nephi
Ogden
Ogden
Ogden
Ogden
Ogden
Orem
Orem
Orem
Payson
Price
Price
Provo
Richfield
Riverton
Roosevelt
Roy
Salem
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
Sandy
Sandy
Sandy
Sandy
St George
Syracuse
Tooele
Tremonton
Vernal
Washington
West Jordan
West Jordan
West Valley
West Valley
West Valley
Willard
Woods Cross
Woods CrossCascade Shadows Garden Center
J and L Garden Center and Contracting
Alpine Gardens
Timberline Gardens
Brooklyn Garden
Birch Creek Gardens
Beaudine’s Nursery
Little Valley Trees Lc
Nole’s Nursery
Woodland Flowers
Marvin’s Garden West
Engh Flowers
J and J Nursery and Garden Center
Linden Nursery
Anderson’s Seed and Garden Store
Greenhouse Garden Center
Late Bloomers
Sunshine Gardens Nursery
Lambert Floral Spring Garden
West Side Nursery
King’s Landscaping
Jerry’s Nursery and Garden Center
Lomond View Nursery
Moore Nursery and Floral
Oak Mountain Christmas Tree
Valley Nursery Inc
Cook’s Farm and Greenhouse
Sun River Gardens Inc
Vineyard Garden Center
Olson’s Garden Shoppe
Cedar Hills Nursery
Cedar Hills Nursery
Cascade Shadows 2
Anderson Garden Center and Greenhouse
Wild Land Nursery
Allred’s Yard and Garden
Stangers Greenhouse and Garden
Laura K Garden Center
Aposhian Gardens and Floral
Ben’s House of Bonsai
C D Nursery
Garden Spot and Nursery
Homestead Nursery
Louise Gardens
Millcreek Gardens
Mitchell’s Nursery and Gifts
Traces Inc
Ward and Child-Garden Store
Western Garden Center
Mitchell’s Nursery and Gifts
Tuscan Garden Works
Wasatch Shadows Nursery Inc
Western Garden Center
Lillywhite’s Plant World
Stoker’s Nursery and Greenhouse
Koeven Greenhouses
Walton’s Valley Nursery
Royal Blooms
Star Nursery
Bland’s Nursery
Glover Nursery
Bruschke’s Greenhouse
Oakbridge Greenhouse and Floral
Western Garden Center
Willard Bay Gardens
Wuthrich’s Center St Greenhouse
Wuthrich’s West Bountiful383 S 500 E
620 N 500 W
1810 S Highway 89
12401 S 300 E
881 S Brooklyn Road
RR 1 Box 32A
210 E 500 N
2555 S 1500 W
2365 N State Road 32
2602 E State Road 35
2220 W 5400 S
1701 N Main Street
1815 W Gentile Street
535 N State Street
69 W Center Street
295 W 300 S
325 S Center Street
50 W 400 N
3910 S Redwood Road
397 W 6400 S
250 S Main Street
1410 N 1900 W
304 W Pleasant View Drive
4780 Old Post Road
1121 E 1675 N
6484 S 2000 E
1645 W 1600 N
1248 N State Street
435 S Geneva Road
1190 W 400 N
140 N Cedar Hills Drive
180 N Cedar Hills Drive
490 S State Street
170 N 400 W
12211 S 4000 W
2210 E US Highway 40
3379 W 5600 S
1066 N State Road 198
6570 W 3500 S
1625 E 6400 S
1733 Catherine Street
5025 Highland Drive
1720 E 6400 S
1550 W 800 S
3500 S 900 E
2184 E 3300 S
1432 S 1100 E
678 S 700 E
550 S 600 E
1220 E 7800 S
9653 S 500 W
9295 S 255 W
9201 S 1300 E
352 E Riverside Drive #C4
2050 S 1000 W
1050 N Main Street
4565 W 11200 N
1260 W 3000 S
385 W Telegraph Street
8630 Redwood Road
9275 S 1300 W
5507 W 3500 S
4740 W 3500 S
4050 W 4100 S
7095 S Highway 89
360 N 800 W
360 N 800 W801-756-6061
801-292-0421
435-723-7748
801-572-7777
435-527-4946
435-462-3717
435-864-5330
435-674-7769
435-783-4134
435-783-2903
801-963-0945
801-776-4490
801-544-1211
801-796-8576
435-752-2345
435-752-7923
435-836-2288
435-259-2570
801-973-9158
801-262-8545
435-623-3319
801-782-4149
801-782-0484
801-479-3250
801-786-1976
801-479-6060
801-225-8271
801-229-1975
801-225-4357
801-465-4422
435-636-0663
435-637-3788
801-377-4237
435-896-8555
801-254-6258
435-722-0898
801-825-0803
801-423-6436
801-250-9692
801-278-9555
801-536-5497
801-274-2533
801-277-5993
801-973-8414
801-487-4131
801-486-2059
801-467-9544
801-595-6622
801-364-7871
801-561-9380
801-233-9434
801-566-0608
801-571-9241
435-628-8004
801-825-7676
435-882-7696
435-257-5041
435-789-7777
435-986-0820
801-561-1321
801-562-5496
801-966-2241
801-968-4632
801-968-4711
435-723-1834
801-295-8960
801-295-8984